• Carlsson, Carl Henrik

    Naturalization and discrimination. Eastern Jews and other immigrants in Sweden, 1860 to 1923

    Ingår i Citizenship under pressure. An institutional narrative about naturalizationin changing boundaries (1880-1923)., 2021.

  • Dulić, Tomislav; Miljan, Goran

    The Ustašas and Fascism: “Abolitionism,” Revolution, and Ideology (1929–42)

    s. 281-309 2020.

    Abstract

    The analysis departs from a discussion about whether one should consider the Croatian Ustašas as fascist, or whether they in fact are best described as radical nationalist group, as was recently argued by Oleksandr Zaitsev in a comparison with the OUN. By combining Mathiesen’s theory of “the unfinished” with the key elements of “generic fascism”, the authors present a new model for the holistic analysis of fascist ideology over time. Following the in-depth theoretical discussion of the phenomenon of fascistisation, they use the Ustašas as an empirical case to elucidate how “abolitionist” movements and organisations keep part of their ideology “unfinished” in public until the acquisition of state power. During an initial “abolitionist” phase, fascists will focus their communication on those ideological elements of importance for the “dogmatic negation” of “the old system”. The ideological elements relevant for the “positive construction” will instead be merely “suggested” until the assumption of power.  We can find the reason behind such strategies in the statist and monistic tenets of fascist ideology, which views the acquisition of political power as an essential prerequisite for the achievement of profound political and societal change. By connecting the process of fascsistisation to the role of agency and state power, the new model also provides a basis for a more refined analysis of the emergence and development of fascist entities.

  • Gordon, Michelle

    Extreme Violence and the 'British Way': Colonial Warfare in Perak, Sierra Leone and Sudan

    Bloomsbury Academic, 2020.

    Abstract

    This study examines the utilisation of extreme violence throughout the British Empire. The role of this violence in the colonisation process is considered in relation to the following three cases: the Perak War (1875–76); the ‘Hut Tax’ Revolt in Sierra Leone (1898–99) and the Anglo-Egyptian War of Reconquest in the Sudan (1896–99). Methods that were used include: looting; the use of collective reprisals on civilians and scorched earth policies; starvation tactics on the enemy as well as the wider population. The decision-making processes that led to atrocities being committed are explored, as well as the significance of individual colonial administrators in outbreaks of violence. The ways in which racial prejudices, the advocacy of a British ‘civilising mission’ and British racial ‘superiority’ informed colonial administrators’ decisions on the ground are considered.

    This violence needs to be written back into British history. Moreover, this study argues that such brutalities are relevant within a wider context of European warfare and the genocidal violence of the first half of the twentieth century. Instances of British colonial violence are revealing regarding the dynamics of extreme violence. The book is divided into five sections: first it considers the place of colonial violence within the history of the British Empire; the three case studies follow; the final chapter provides an analysis of the cases studies’ findings and discusses its relevance for our understanding of both European and colonial violence, thereby placing British colonial violence within a wider framework of extreme European violence.

  • Miljan, Goran; Mihaljević, Josip

    Was Tito's Yugoslavia not Totalitarian?

    Ingår i Istorija 20 veka, s. 223-248, 2020.

    Abstract

    This paper is a response to the article “Was Tito’s Yugoslavia totalitarian?” published in the journal Communist and Post-Communist Studies 47 (2014). The two authors indicate the inadequate theoretical framework and untenable interpretations made by Flere and Klanjšek, who provided a distorted picture of former Yugoslav society and the position of an individual in it. Their reduced theory of totalitarianism combined with their simplified interpretations served their aim of proving that the system established by the Yugoslav communists was not totalitarian nor did it strive to become one. Flere and Klanjšek’s main argument for the absence of totalitarianism is that of a federal state concept of Yugoslavia, which is not in correlation with contemporary understanding of totalitarianism. By deconstructing their arguments, this article argues for a more elaborated and up-to-date conceptual understanding of Tito’s Yugoslavia and its relation to the concept of totalitarianism.

    Open access
  • Dulić, Tomislav; Miljan, Goran

    The Ustašas and Fascism : “Abolitionism,” Revolution, and Ideology (1929–42)

    Ingår i Journal of Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society, s. 281-309, 2020.

    Abstract

    The analysis departs from a discussion about whether one should consider the Croatian Ustašas as fascist, or whether they in fact are best described as radical nationalist group, as was recently argued by Oleksandr Zaitsev in a comparison with the OUN. By combining Mathiesen’s theory of “the unfinished” with the key elements of “generic fascism”, the authors present a new model for the holistic analysis of fascist ideology over time. Following the in-depth theoretical discussion of the phenomenon of fascistisation, they use the Ustašas as an empirical case to elucidate how “abolitionist” movements and organisations keep part of their ideology “unfinished” in public until the acquisition of state power. During an initial “abolitionist” phase, fascists will focus their communication on those ideological elements of importance for the “dogmatic negation” of “the old system”. The ideological elements relevant for the “positive construction” will instead be merely “suggested” until the assumption of power.  We can find the reason behind such strategies in the statist and monistic tenets of fascist ideology, which views the acquisition of political power as an essential prerequisite for the achievement of profound political and societal change. By connecting the process of fascsistisation to the role of agency and state power, the new model also provides a basis for a more refined analysis of the emergence and development of fascist entities.

  • Heuman, Johannes; Rudberg, Pontus

    Holocaust Memory in Sweden: A Re-evaluation

    Ingår i Early Holocaust Memory in Sweden, 2020.

  • Heuman, Johannes; Rudberg, Pontus

    Holocaust Memory in Sweden: A Re-evaluation

    Ingår i Early Holocaust Memory in Sweden, 2020.

  • Heuman, Johannes; Rudberg, Pontus

    Early Holocaust Memory in Sweden: Archives, Testimonies and Reflections

    2020.

    Abstract

    This book investigates the memory of the Holocaust in Sweden and concentrates on early initiatives to document and disseminate information about the genocide during the late 1940s until the early 1960s. As the first collection of testimonies and efforts to acknowledge the Holocaust contributed to historical research, judicial processes, public discussion, and commemorations in the universalistic Swedish welfare state, the chapters analyse how and in what ways the memory of the Holocaust began to take shape, showing the challenges and opportunities that were faced in addressing the traumatic experiences of a minority. In Sweden, the Jewish trauma could be linked to positive rescue actions instead of disturbing politics of collaboration, suggesting that the Holocaust memory was less controversial than in several European nations following the war. This book seeks to understand how and in what ways the memory of the Holocaust began to take shape in the developing Swedish welfare state and emphasises the role of transnational Jewish networks for the developing Holocaust memory in Sweden.

  • Gordon, Michelle

    Prospects for a Bewältigung of Extreme Violence in Britain's Imperial Past

    Ingår i Modern Languages Open, s. 1-17, 2020.

    Abstract

    This article addresses how (‘selective’) British memory has served to emphasize the extreme violence perpetrated by others at the expense of a critical examination of brutalities in ‘British history’. Not least, the genocidal violence perpetrated by (British) settler colonisers, as well as the extreme violence that was inherent throughout the systems of administrative colonialism. The ‘history wars’ in Australia have not penetrated ‘British history’. Assumptions are often based on British ‘exceptionalism’; an approach mirrored by British memorialisation and museum exhibitions, including Britain’s Holocaust Memorial Day and the Imperial War Museum. That the knowledge produced by scholars on the key linkages between Britain and extreme violence is not translating to the wider public, has been demonstrated through Brexit debates. The British Empire has loomed large in these discussions, on all levels of society, and politicians have been particularly willing to use ahistorical narratives to further their causes. The ongoing significance of empire to British national identity has also been demonstrated by recent polls on perceptions of the British Empire. National narratives are currently being confronted across Europe in the face of increased right-wing populism and anti-EU sentiments. In this context, thresholds are continuously being crossed. An example of ahistorical/selective narratives is the British foreign secretary’s comparison between the EU and a Soviet gulag. ‘Balance sheet’ approaches to the Empire in particular have served to continue narratives of British ‘exceptionalism’. This crisis or selectivity of memory has brought us to a crossroads. A responsible and critical assessment of Britain’s relationship with extreme violence is necessary; we must move beyond a patriotic approach (Drayton).

    Open access
  • Dogan, Recep

    Can Honor Killings Be Explained With the Concept of Social Death?: Reinterpreting Social Psychological Evidence

    Ingår i Homicide Studies, s. 127-150, 2020.

    Abstract

    This article uses the concept of social death to explore the experiences and motivations of perpetrators of honor killings in light of social psychological evidence. This analysis then seeks an explanation for some honor killing cases where ostracism or extreme social exclusion of the perpetrator has preceded the murder. I argue that in some honor killing cases, extreme rejection and exclusion may lead the individual to feel that he or she has no choice but to seek validation or approval through killing to be re-included and recognized by the community and family.

  • Rudberg, Pontus

    Från Malakis rop till Rakels tårar: Stockholms synagoga under de mörka åren 1933–1945

    Ingår i Jag må bo mitt ibland dem, s. 79-94, 2020.

  • Gröndahl, Satu

    Minority literature as an emancipatory force: The development of Tornedalian and Sweden-Finnish literature

    Ingår i Ways of being in the world, s. 48-76, 2020.

  • Gröndahl, Satu

    Hundar som heter Seppo: Några reflektioner kring den litterära flerspråkigheten

    Ingår i Där Östersjön ät VästersjönFestskrift till Virve och Raimo Raag, s. 25-35, 2020.

  • Ackermann-Boström, Constanze

    A multilingual soul

    Ingår i Multilingual is normal, s. 98-100, 2020.

  • Fur, Gunlög; Hennessey, John

    Svensk kolonialism, Sverige och kolonialism eller svenskar och kolonialism?: Introduktion

    Ingår i Historisk Tidskrift (S), s. 375-384, 2020.

    Open access
  • Carlsson, Carl Henrik

    Parallella processer - ståtlig synagoga och kamp för rättigheter

    Ingår i jag må bo mitt ibland dem. Stockholms stora synagoga 150 år, s. 9-21, 2020.

  • Carlsson, Carl Henrik

    Synagogans rabbiner och kantorer

    Ingår i jag må bo mitt ibland dem. Stockholms stora synagoga 150 år, s. 194-197, 2020.

  • Rudberg, Pontus

    Holocaust Testimonies in Jewish Compensation Claims in the United Restitution Organisation’s Archive in Stockholm

    Ingår i Early Holocaust Memory in Sweden, s. 93-117, 2020.

    Abstract

    This chapter deals with testimonies derived from legal processes and documents the creation of several bureaus for the provision of legal aid to Jewish refugees and survivors making claims against Germany, Poland and other countries between 1947 and 1950. Yet another bureau, The URO Bureau, was created in 1953 as a national branch of the international United Restitution Organisation to assist individuals who wanted to file claims for restitution in line with the German compensation laws of 1952. The files of these bureaus include both the applicants’ personal testimonies and the final accounts that were part of the applications, drafted in the more objective and detached style that is typical of legal testimonies. The author shows how claims for justice have influenced the narratives in these testimonies.

  • Dulić, Tomislav

    Memories in Conflict: Historical Trauma, Collective Memory and Justice Since 1989

    2020.

    Abstract

    This volume explores the relationship between political change and collective memory about traumatic historical events since 1989. Departing from an interdisciplinary theoretical perspective that bridges the divide between the humanities and social sciences, four empirical chapters provide in-depth analyses of the profound effect the changes that began with the fall of the socialist system in Eastern Europe have had on the way in which traumatic memories of the past have been dealt with during the last three decades. By exploring case studies from Poland, Croatia, the United Kingdom and Chile, the contributions show how traumatic collective mem-ories have been used in state-sponsored memory production, for the purpose of national mobilisation and as a means by which to mobilise social movements. While focusing on different perspec-tives across time and space, the case studies thus highlight the con-nection between collective memory, identity and calls for justice on both societal and group levels. 

  • Gordon, Michelle

    Transitions in British Decolonisation: The Case of Horatio Herbert Kitchener

    Ingår i Memories in Conflict, s. 77-98, 2020.

  • Dulic, Tomislav

    Memories in Conflict: Historical Trauma, Collective Memory and Justice since 1989

    2020.

  • Kostic, Roland; Kostic, Roland

    Collective Memory in Transition: Bridging the Divide Between the Humanities and Social Sciences

    Ingår i Memories in Conflict, 2020.

  • Dulic, Tomislav

    Introduction

    Ingår i Memories in Conflict, 2020.

  • Hennessey, John L.

    A Colonial Trans-Pacific Partnership: William Smith Clark, David Pearce Penhallow and Japanese Settler Colonialism in Hokkaido

    Ingår i Settler Colonial Studies, s. 54-73, 2020.

    Abstract

    Immediately following the Meiji Restoration of 1868, the new, Western-oriented Japanese government decided to make the colonization of the adjacent northern island of Hokkaido a showcase of and economic engine for Japanese modernity. In so doing, Japanese leaders consciously modelled Japanese settler colonialism there on American models, particularly in the treatment of the indigenous Ainu. As part of this project, a large number of American advisors were hired, including three American professors from Massachusetts Agricultural College who were to found a similar institution in Sapporo. Although the story of these professors is well-known in Japan, their connections to Japanese settler colonialism have never been properly investigated. I argue that these professors, most importantly William Smith Clark and David Pearce Penhallow, served as important conduits of colonial knowledge, spreading both American technologies of settler colonialism to Japan and a positive image of Japanese imperialism in the United States after their return. Most significantly, they spread new, ‘scientific’ understandings of the Ainu that conformed to classic Western colonial tropes and contributed to their systematic dispossession. In these ways, these American ‘brokers of imperialism’ worked in tandem with their Japanese employers to both physically and discursively reform Hokkaido into an American-style ‘frontier’.

    Open access
  • Gordon, Michelle

    Selective Histories: Britain, the Empire and the Holocaust

    Ingår i The Palgrave Handbook of Britain and the Holocaust, 2020.

    Abstract

    The purpose of this chapter is to address the ways in which selective readings of Holocaust history have informed both Holocaust memorialisations in the UK and how the British Empire is represented and remembered. While an awareness of the Holocaust in the UK has been raised,  there is a tendency in the UK to emphasise the perpetration of violence by others while occluding Britain’s historical role in extreme violence. This chapter argues explorations of the Holocaust need to be accompanied—not replaced—by greater examination and self-reflection related to British history and violence. There has long been a prevalent view of the British Empire, which tends to adhere to the longstanding view that the empire was fundamentally benevolent and was beneficial to both the ‘colonisers’ and the ‘colonised’; this approach needs to be challenged and the violent legacies of empire acknowledged.

  • Becker, Lior

    Yizkor Books and Communal Commemoration

    Ingår i Mishpologen - Medlemsblad för Judiska Släktforskningsföreningen, 2020.

  • Kostić, Roland

    Shifting Identities, Policy Networks, and the Practical and Ethical Challenges of Gaining Access to the Field in Interventions

    Ingår i Doing Fieldwork in Areas of International Intervention, s. 23-36, 2020.

  • Kostić, Roland; Dulić, Tomislav

    Collective Memory in Transition: Bridging the Divide Between the Humanities and Social Science

    Ingår i Memories in Conflict, s. 13-34, 2020.

  • Fur, Gunlog; Hennessey, John L.

    Swedish colonialism, Sweden and colonialism or Swedes and colonialism?

    Ingår i Historisk Tidskrift (S), s. 375-384, 2020.

  • Guthrey, Holly L.

    “Vigilante” Expressions of Social Memory in Chile: Exploring La Comisi.n Funa as a Response to Justice Deficits

    Ingår i Memories in Conflict, 2020.

  • Ionescu, Stefan Cristian

    Theorists of Economic Nationalism in 1930s-1940s Romania

    Ingår i Nationalities Papers, s. 264-279, 2019.

    Abstract

    This article examines the main theorists of economic nationalism (Romanianization) and their ideas promoting protectionism and anti-Semitism in 1930s–1940s Romania. Trying to offer a rational scientific justification for excluding foreigners, especially Jews, and increasing the role of ethnic Romanians in the economy, major scholars of economics offered solutions toward successful Romanianization. Because some of these economists were also influential politicians and public intellectuals, their investigations and blueprints for the project gained wide publicity and provided steps for achieving it rapidly and thoroughly. These economists disseminated their theoretical and empirical constructions of Romanianization in university courses, public lectures, and publications. Some were important scholars; among them, Virgil Madgearu, Mihail Manoilescu, Gheorghe N. Leon, Ion Răducanu, and D. R. Ioaniţescu, They examined Romanianization of the economy from the 1930s to the 1940s and influenced the agenda of local elites and the general public, due to their prestigious positions as politicians, public intellectuals, and professors at local universities.

  • Hennessey, John

    Imperial Ardor or Apathy?: A Comparative International Historiography of Popular Imperialism

    Ingår i History Compass, 2019.

    Abstract

    Were the ordinary citizens of imperial metropoles during the 19th and 20th centuries arduous supporters or apathetic observers of their country's colonial expansionism,or did their relationship to empire fall somewhere in between? Although this is a central question for understanding the how and why of modern imperialism and evaluating responsibility for colonial wrongs, scholars in the only loosely knit field of popular imperialism have arrived at widely divergent answers. Complementing its companion article, “By Jingo! Methods for Researching Popular Imperialism,” this article will present an overviewof the conclusions of existing studies and present ways that future studies can become more theoretically and methodologically sophisticated through inspiration from comparativeand transnational history, nationalism studies, and genocide studies.

  • Hennessey, John

    By Jingo!: Methods for Researching Popular Imperialism

    Ingår i History Compass, 2019.

    Abstract

    The study of popular imperialism, or the extent to which the ordinary citizens of an imperial metropole were aware of and supported their country’s imperial expansion, provides a crucial empirical basis for evaluating the causes of and responsibility for colonial aggression. Nevertheless, this topic has received considerably less attention than comparable topics like fascism, genocide or nationalism, and a comparative conversation between scholars of different empires is largely lacking. Together with a companion article, “Imperial Ardor or Apathy? A Comparative International Historiography of Popular Imperialism,” this article will provide inspiration for future studies by summarizing different approaches to and methodological problems involved in the study of popular imperialism, drawing on a wide range of research on several empires.

  • Gordon, Michelle

    Viewing Violence in the British Empire: Images of Atrocity from the Battle of Omdurman, 1898

    Ingår i Journal of Perpetrator Research, s. 65 65-100 100, 2019.

    Abstract

    This article explores a range of photographs taken in the aftermath of the Battle of Omdurman on 2 September 1898, the final and decisive battle of the Anglo-Egyptian Reconquest of the Sudan (1896–98). This campaign was particularly controversial for the methods that were used against the Mahdia, which included the massacring of the enemy wounded and those trying to surrender. The photographs under examination are relevant to considerations of the ensuing controversies of the campaign in which Kitchener was obliged to write directly to Queen Victoria to explain his actions, notably in relation to the bombing of the Mahdi's tomb and the treatment of his remains. As historians have previously noted, the events in Omdurman constituted a massacre rather than a battle, and areas of dispute include whether Emirs were specifically targeted for destruction in the campaign. The photographs in question contribute to this debate. This article addresses the photographs in the wider context of violence throughout the British Empire and in the context of other images of British violence. That such photographs are not commonly viewed and discussed speaks to wider issues regarding popular perceptions of the 'benevolent' British Empire, particularly in comparison to its European counterparts.

    Open access
  • Guthrey, Holly L.

    Microlevel Security after Armed Conflict: A New Framework for Analyzing Risks and Benefits of Peacebuilding Processes

    Ingår i International Studies Review, 2019.

    Abstract

    The maintenance and/or achievement of security is of paramount importance within settings recovering from armed conflict; however existing studies in the field of peacebuilding do not sufficiently explore how various processes undertaken within peacebuilding programming result in different types of security outcomes at the individual and community level. In this article, I develop a novel conceptual framework for analyzing “micro-level” security risks and benefits of peacebuilding processes, through an adapted version of Johan Galtung’s work on direct and structural violence. For the purposes of this article, the framework is applied in the context of “local” transitional justice (TJ) processes used in the aftermath of armed conflict, for which advocacy and implementation has increased in the recent past. Relying on a social psychological definition of security, I disaggregate components of direct and structural violence and use illustrative examples from existing empirical studies about the effects of local TJ processes in various settings to demonstrate ways in which these types of violence may be perpetuated, or initiated in new forms through these processes, thus posing security risks. The framework is further developed through the elucidation of factors that may help to repair the consequences of direct and structural violence and/or hinder the likelihood of their repetition, thematically conceptualized as physical and psychological welfare and social justice (respective to direct and structural violence) that I suggest link to security benefits. The framework intends to provide new perspectives on understanding how peacebuilding processes may both promote and prevent security from being realized at the local level following armed conflict.

  • Dulić, Tomislav

    Among the Hyperboreans: Yugoslav prisoners in Norway 1942-1945

    Ingår i Forced Labour in Serbia, s. 118-139, 2019.

    Abstract

    This article provides new insights into the violence suffered by more than four thousand Yugoslavs who were deported to Norway by Nazi Germany during the Second World War. Placed in labour camps throughout the country, they were made to work under extremely harsh conditions on projects such as road construction and military installations. Particular attention is paid to their interaction with prison guards and to the political conflicts that emerged within the prisoner group. The findings of sociologist Nils Christie on the camp guards are juxtaposed against new sources from Belgrade, which became fully available to scholars in the early 2000s. These new sources show how the camp administrations exploited the terrible hygienic conditions, malnutrition and negative stereotypes about a violence-prone “Balkan culture” to create emotional distance between prisoners and guards. The prisoners complained that they were not given enough food or sufficient opportunity to maintain their hygiene, which they attributed to a conscious policy on the part of the camp administration. Lice infestations, outbreaks of typhus and malaria, combined with extrajudicial executions, not least of prisoners who fell ill, resulted in a death toll of over sixty percent for the Yugoslavs. The Yugoslavs thus suffered among the highest death tolls of any national or ethnic community relocated to Scandinavia during the war. The analysis further deals with prisoner escapes to Sweden, which were often made possible by help from Norwegian civilians. Such experiences contributed to the very positive image of Norway and Norwegians in the witness statements taken by the Yugoslav embassy in Stockholm. These statements also show that the prisoners had a very positive view of how they were treated by the authorities upon arrival in Sweden.

    Open access
  • Rudberg, Pontus

    The Swedish Jews and the Holocaust

    Routledge, 2019.

  • Miljan, Goran

    The Ustasha Youth and the Aryanization of Jewish Property in the Independent State of Croatia, 1941-1945

    Ingår i European Holocaust Studies, s. 113-132, 2019.

  • Porter, Jim Wynter

    Guidance counseling in the mid-twentieth century United States:: Measurement, grouping, and the making of the intelligent self

    Ingår i History of Science, 2019.

    Abstract

    This article investigates National Defense Education Act and National Defense Education Act-related calls in the late 1950s for the training of guidance counselors, an emergent profession that was to play an instrumental role in both the measuring and placement of students in schools by “intelligence” or academic “ability”. In analyzing this mid-century push for more guidance counseling in schools, this article will first explore a foundational argument for the fairness of intelligence testing made by Educational Testing Service psychometrician William Turnbull in 1951, and then later taken up and employed by other National Defense Education Act-era advocates of testing and grouping. Secondly, this analysis will proceed to National Defense Education Act expert testimony, examining here assertions of the necessity of guidance counseling in schools, and an emergent and shared vision articulating the role guidance counseling was supposed to play in school life. A pattern or structure to this vision emerges here. According to its advocates, guidance counseling would not only inform the self-understanding of the measured individual, but it would also work to condition the ideology of individual intelligence across numerous layers of social life around the student: through peer group, through teachers and school administrators, and finally through home, family, and the wider community.

    Open access
  • Gröndahl, Satu

    Fjäll i förvandling: Sydsamiska röster under hundra år

    Ingår i Acta Academiae Regiae Scientiarum Upsaliensis Kungl. Vetenskapssamhällets i Uppsala Handlingar, s. 47-63, 2019.

  • Gröndahl, Satu; Grönstrand, Heidi

    Editors' Note

    Ingår i Multiethnica. Meddelande från Centrum för multietnisk forskning, Uppsala universitet, s. 7-11, 2019.

  • Hennessey, John L.

    Assimilation, Association and French Advice to Japan on how to Rule Taiwan

    Ingår i French Colonial History, s. 101-127, 2019.

    Abstract

    What trans-imperial connections existed between the French and Japanese Empires? One example that is frequently recounted in Japanese colonial historiography involves the 1895 advice of French legal expert Michel Revon over what administrative system Japan should adopt in Taiwan. According to these accounts, Revon advocated a French assimilationist system for the island in a policy brief that would strongly influence future Japanese Prime Minister Hara Takashi. This article demonstrates that this account is not entirely accurate, offering a new analysis of the primary source material in the context of the prevailing French colonial theories of the 1890s. It argues that Revon was in fact an advocate of association and that Hara Takashi’s program of colonial assimilation was only superficially influenced by French models.

  • Gröndahl, Satu

    Minoritetslitteraturers utveckling -: från marginalisering till egenmakt?

    Ingår i Svensklärarföreningens årsskrift, s. 95-112, 2019.

  • Kostić, Roland; Bliesemman de Guevara, Berit

    Knowledge, expertise and the politics of intervention and statebuilding

    Ingår i Handbook on Intervention and Statebuilding, s. 19-29, 2019.

  • Miljan, Goran

    Croatia and the Rise of Fascism: the Youth Movement and the Ustasha During WWII

    I.B. Tauris, 2018.

    Abstract

    During World War II, Croatia became a fascist state under the control of the Ustasha Movement - allied with Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. Here, Goran Miljan examines and analyzes for the first time the ideology, practices, and international connections of the Ustasha Youth organization. The Ustasha Youth was an all-embracing fascist youth organization, established in July 1941 by the `Independent State of Croatia' with the goal of reeducating young people in the model of an ideal `new' Croat. This youth organization attempted to set in motion an all-embracing, totalitarian national revolution which in reality consisted of specific interconnected, mutually dependent practices: prosecution, oppression, mass murder, and the Holocaust - all of which were officially legalized within a month of the regime's accession to power. To this end education, sport, manual work and camping took place in specially established Ustasha Youth Schools. In order to justify their radical policies of youth reeducation, the Ustasha Youth, besides emphasizing national character and the importance of cultural and national purity, also engaged in transnational activities and exchanges, especially with the Hlinkova mladez [Hlinka Youth] of the Slovak Republic. Both youth organizations were closely modelled after the youth organizations in Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. This is a little studied part of the history of World War II and of Fascism, and will be essential reading for scholars of Central Europe and the Holocaust

  • Doğan, Recep

    Do Women Really Kill for Honor?: Conceptualizing Women’s Involvement in Honor Killings.

    Ingår i Deviant behavior, s. 1247-1266, 2018.

    Abstract

    So far, women’s involvement in honor killings has been attempted to explain with the emphasis on either patriarchy or the concept of hegemonic masculinity.  However, the current conceptualization of women involved in honor killings is not completely representative of all of the cases. The accurate portrayal of women’s involvement in such killings requires a broader understanding of particular circumstances of the female perpetrators, the whole dynamic behind honor killings, and of the particular relationship between victim and the perpetrator. Through reflecting on the narratives of five female perpetrators, this article aims to provide this missing focus.

  • Schulz, Philipp

    Displacement from gendered personhood: sexual violence and masculinities in northern Uganda

    Ingår i International Affairs, s. 1101-+, 2018.

    Abstract

    This article empirically deconstructs the gendered effects of sexual violence on male survivors' masculinities in northern Uganda. Throughout the growing literature on the topic, the effects of wartime gender-based violence against men are widely seen as compromising male survivors' masculine identities, commonly framed as ‘emasculation’ by way of ‘feminization’ and/or ‘homo-sexualization’. Yet exactly how such processes unfold from survivors' perspectives remains insufficiently explored, nor has existing scholarship critically engaged with the dominant analytical categories and their associated terminologies. This article seeks to engage with both of these gaps. First, I identify normative and analytical shortcomings of the ‘emasculation’/‘feminization’ paradigm. Drawing on Edström, Dolan and colleagues, I propose an alternative reading to analyse the effects of sexual violence on gender identities. Second, I argue that the impact of sexual violence on masculinities is a layered process, compounded through numerous sexual and gendered harms and perpetuated over time. In northern Uganda, this process is composed of intersecting gendered harms that subordinate male survivors along gendered hierarchies, and that signify survivors' perceived inabilities to provide, protect and procreate—as expected of them by local constructions of hegemonic masculinity. I therefore emphasize that sexual violence against men strikes at multiple levels of what it means to be a man, which is important to understanding and addressing these layered gendered harms in the aftermath of the violations.

  • Heuman, Johannes

    « Comme les Juifs sous l’Occupation »: La mémoire de la Shoah dans la lutte antiraciste en France, 1944-1967

    Ingår i Archives Juives, s. 39 39-58 58, 2018.

    Abstract

    This article analyzes memory of the Shoah in post-War antiracist movements, notably the Mouvement contre le racisme, l’antisémitisme et pour la paix (MRAP) and the Ligue internationale contre le racisme et l’antisémitisme (LICA, today the LICRA). Jews’ experiences of the occupation were generally more visible in the discourse of the MRAP than in that of the LICA, which emphasized the universal aspect of Nazi crimes. In general, a fear of fascism returning was the main motivator in this early activation of memory of the Shoah. However, the two organizations also used this memory as a reference to protest against discriminations suffered by Arabs (MRAP) as well as antisemitism in Eastern Europe and the Arab world (LICA).

  • Guthrey, Holly L.; Brounéus, Karen

    The Challenge of Reconciling Tradition with Truth and Reconciliation Commission Processes: The Case of Solomon Islands

    Ingår i Understanding Quality Peace, 2018.

  • Carlsson, Carl Henrik

    Tidiga judar i Stockholm

    Ingår i Gravstenar berättar, s. 113-143, 2018.